Beyond the Criminal Penalties of Connecticut Family Violence

An accusation of family violence should never be taken lightly. Even if someone isn’t accused in a criminal court, civil courts can impose plenty of penalties for family violence in Connecticut. These penalties can and will follow a person for life, making regular activities difficult.

Family violence is broader than you might think. Connecticut defines family violence as “an event between family or household members that either causes physical injury or creates fear that physical injury is about to happen.” [...]

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What It Means to Be Charged with Possession with Intent to Sell in CT

Being caught in possession of illegal drugs is certainly a crime, but, you can count on being penalized more severely if it’s found you intended to distribute them.

The War on Drugs is the heart of a historic push for high penalties when convicted of selling drugs. It was meant to cut off the supply at its source decades ago, and are still on the law books today.

Connecticut is no different; the War on Drugs affected the laws here, [...]

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Will Surveillance Technology Lead to More CT Burglary Charges in 2020?

Technology continues to march forward in every industry, and that includes surveillance. 2020 will see new and interesting developments in how technology is used to keep people and their belongings safe.

New kinds of surveillance should help the police curtail burglary, or at least be a catalyst to more burglary charges in Connecticut.

These new technologies make use of cloud computing and crowdsourcing. In general, the current surveillance trend is to increase the number of cameras and increase connectivity. The [...]

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An Overview of Misdemeanor Classes in Connecticut

Connecticut recently brought misdemeanors into the limelight with their decision to lower a significant number of drug charges from felonies to misdemeanors.

This is good news for those facing charges for minor crimes, including drug possession. The change significantly increases the number of charges that Connecticut now considers misdemeanor crimes.

The bipartisan effort to pass this new legislation comes behind a larger movement to save Connecticut tax dollars by rethinking how we handle low-level, nonviolent drug offenders.

So how are [...]

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